Get Social

Archive for July 2011

As I worked with a potential client today on social strategies for high-end designer clothing and accessories, I starting listing the merits of Instagram. I love it for personal shots around town, and it’s even inspired me to make a purchase from a brand I follow. I described the site as a photo-sharing tool to engage a community between brands and their customers, and threw out names of a few brands I follow. (Also noteworthy are accounts from giants in their own rights, Starbucks, NPR, and the Boston Celtics.) Anyway, here’s a quick case study of three fashion brands using Instagram to build and grow a mobile community, and why each rocks in its own way.

Kate Spade

new literature-inspired clutches, seen first on the Instagram feed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve been a customer of Kate Spade over 10 years; my first “adult” wallet was a little nylon number that cost a whopping $110 but lasted me 6 years. I’ve followed the brand on twitter for the past 8 months or so and have eaten up the links to product shots and playful banter between customers and the brand avatar. They’re on their game with bi-weekly emails as well, highlighting a “color of the month,” sample sales (!), and free shipping offers. But how do they use Instagram? Their savvy social media maven started sharing product shots (including brand new pieces, which I could view before they even hit the website), behind-the-scenes grabs from window sets, and cutesy finds from around town. Branded as the hip, happy-go-lucky girl in the big city (think, what Carrie Bradshaw would share if she were snapping photos with her iPhone), there’s been an interesting shift in the past 6 weeks or so from these distanced posts to more personal content. Fans see where this mystery gal is grabbing a gelato on the Upper West Side, what music festival she went to last weekend, and who she’s meeting with at industry parties. But we’ve never seen her. She’s the anonymous fun girl everyone wants to be. She’s also keeping her Instagram feed relatively separate from Facebook and Twitter marketing(the service easily posts to these networks from inside the app)– so here’s a more isolated, VIP look inside the brand.

Current Follow Count: 28,285.

so this is what it looks like inside a fashion house, huh?

Oscar de La Renta

She’s gorgeous (from what we can see of her), she’s powerful, and she wears designer dresses like it’s her job– ’cause it is. Meet oscarprgirl, “reporting from inside one of the world’s most prestigious fashion houses.” Holy product beauty shots, batman! We meet the designer’s collections firsthand through shots of this lovely lady rocking the duds, as well as ambient shots of the sweet locations work sends her to, behind-the-scenes shots at fashion shoots, and other shots from her worldly adventures. Always with a cute and descriptive caption, I love feeling in the know about these impossibly unaffordable garments– like reading Vogue at the hair dresser, but better.

Current followers: 4,231.

Free People

I love following Free People on Twitter because they’re constantly sharing fun office culture tidbits (like who brought their dog in today) and linking to new products. You can also comment on and rate products on their website using a nice interface that actually looks useful, which I learned about thanks to Twitter.

Since Instagram allows you to mark your location alongside a photo, many of this brand’s shots come from the Home Office. They’re mostly photos of various team members (this company has a lotof accessory buyers, let me tell you!), all decked out in Free People gear. Oh, and they hit up the Pitchfork Music Fest last weekend, so fans got a glimpse of some performing acts via this feed as well. I love Free People’s bright and breezy style, and am I influenced on a daily basis to shop their collections by seeing funky people outfitted in them? You betcha.

Current Follow Count: 3,947.

adorable dress, as per usual on Free People's feed

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